Film (56)

After the limited success of 2016’s all-female Ghostbusters, whose reasonable box office was stifled by its massive production budget of $144 million, it was a brave move to reinvent another much-loved franchise in the same gender-swapping way. Still, that’s what Warner Bros. has done with the latest chapter of the Ocean’s saga, Ocean’s Eight. That bravery has been more than rewarded, as the new movie has already passed the Ghostbusters total box office, despite having less than half the budget.
Having recently celebrated its 40th birthday, we have to go quite a way back to when Dallas first hit the air in 1978. What’s perhaps most surprising about it all is that the show still holds up. In fact, it’s quality enough drama to be on prime time television today, even amidst the supposed golden age of television. Despite the series being made a quarter of a century ago, the characters and stories are just as compelling as they were then. Hagman’s performance is delicious, and Duffy is on point. Some of the other performances can be over-acted, certainly; but it was the 80’s after all, so it’s forgivable.
Screenwriter and novelist GF Newman (22nd May 1948) best known for the creation of TV character Judge John Deed (2001-2007) starring the talented and versatile Martin Shaw, a maverick judge who forgoes the usual pomp and circumstance associated with our legal system, in particular the courtroom, and New Street Law (2006-2007), a drama about two rival law firms of barristers based in Manchester,
Prisons, with their collection of colourful personalities, is bound to create a melting pot of incidents and situations, that makes every day a challenge and eventful for the staff and inmates. A habitation, where acts of humanity and brutality rub shoulders regularly.
In the mid-sixties, the world saw the birth of hippies. A counterculture which questioned so much about society, and was not afraid to suggest an alternative lifestyle to the norm. A spectacular movement, with colourful clothes, magnificent music in the guise of The Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix and many more, with mind-bending drugs and free love. An ethos that went way beyond being a bored teenager and got the entire world thinking.
Before Al Pacino gained worldwide recognition as a talented actor and achieved global fame from his spellbinding appearance as Michael Corleone in The Godfather, he had been a fringe actor. Only appearing in three feature films, and just one of those as a lead, The Panic in Needle Park, it was from this appearance that Francis Ford Coppola knew Al Pacino was perfect for The Godfather.
The Boost opens with the hustle and bustle of Manhattan in the late eighties, contemporary jazz music blends in with the opening credits, creating a mood of affluence and positivity, as it was a period for many of upward mobility, career opportunities and lucrative schemes, some legit and some not.
Multi-award-winning filmmaker, Guillermo del Toro, returns to the big screen in his 10th feature film as Director to give the audience a visual masterwork, original, poignant, elegant love story in The Shape of the Water, which del Toro also writes and produces.
The fascination of the inner workings of the illegal drug game has always been part and parcel of the entertainment industry. Films like The French Connection, Scarface and Traffic long ago cemented themselves into the category of “timeless” in documenting the glitz and glamour in addition to the harsh and brutal realities of what goes on behind the scenes before anyone sets eyes on their party favours for the weekend.
Darkest Hour is a triumphantly superb, inspiring historical World War II drama directed by Joe Wright and written by Anthony McCarten. The core of which is about an unabashed man, Winston Churchill (played with relentless, flawless magnificence by Gary Oldman) thrown in the middle of the some of the most unimaginable inhumane crazy set of circumstances at the beginning of his career as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.
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