Chris Baxter

Tuesday, 20 March 2018 16:03

VR, AR, and the Future of Entertainment

After an extremely long time in development, it finally looks like VR and AR are making their way into mainstream acceptance and use. Far from the primitive devices like Nintendo's earlier Virtual Boy, modern VR headsets come in full colour and operate in a way which is not guaranteed to set off migraines and eye strain. Despite the amount of technological progress these have made, they still remain in their mainstream infancy. This leads us to wonder – where are these technologies going, and what can we expect in terms of their integration with modern education and entertainment?
Life in the 21st Century is all-consuming. It’s stimulating 24/7 and society dictates that we all need things now and can’t demonstrate patience. There’s so much to see and do today that our minds get too easily distracted. We can lose focus on tasks at hand and want to move on to something else all too quickly.
There’s no doubt that pop, rock and rap stars are some of the highest-paid entertainers on our planet. They have worldwide followings, with sold-out tours wherever they go, as well as millions of album sales. You’d think that would be enough money in the bank but, for some people, the challenge of going into business and building on that foundation as a global icon has proved too great.
It seems like an implausible scenario now, but there was once a day when the sun beat down on Wembley Stadium, an England side had just rammed four past Germany, and the World Cup was on its way to Lancaster Gate. That day was July 30, 1966, a date that every true Englander knows as well as the Battle of Hastings, the declaration of World War II, or the death of Princess Diana. It represented the completion of an impossible dream, forged by many years of toil, ingenuity and fortitude.
Poker is a traditional card game with almost two centuries of heritage. The earliest versions of poker date back to the late 1820s, when Joseph Crowell, an American writer and politician, discussed the game in some of his memoirs.
Thursday, 15 February 2018 12:06

The Rise and Rise of Jamie Vardy

No other English professional footballer in the 21st century has made quite the rise from non-league to top-flight stardom like Jamie Vardy. The 31-year-old’s leap to stardom has been likened to a real-life version of the comic book classic, Roy of the Rovers, who used to defy the odds as Rovers’ leading marksman.
Last spring, Blackburn Rovers gained the unwanted distinction of being the first Premier League championship-winning club to drop into the third tier of English football. Inevitably, Blackburn’s relegation to League 1 at the end of 2016/17 precipitated a slew of stark comparisons, between the current Venky’s regime and the ownership of steel magnate Jack Walker in the 1990s.

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